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The Joy of Being Wrong: A Reflection on Acts 11.1-18

A common theme the past two Sundays has been people’s commitment to being in the right leading them to be in the wrong. Two weeks ago, it was Saul, whose good and true commitments to orthodoxy and unity within the Jewish community had caused him to persecute the followers of Jesus. And last Sunday, it … Continue reading The Joy of Being Wrong: A Reflection on Acts 11.1-18

Ad Fontes and Sola Scriptura: Reading the Bible in the Reformation

In the previous post in this series on the history of biblical interpretation, we saw how the Middle Ages were a period of stability in hermeneutics, with the Church more or less happy to interpret the Scriptures as they had traditionally been interpreted and within the broader context of the Church’s faith and worship. The … Continue reading Ad Fontes and Sola Scriptura: Reading the Bible in the Reformation

‘The Faith Once Delivered to the Saints’: Tradition and Scripture from the Medieval World to Today

By the time the Western Roman Empire fell at the end of the fifth century, ushering in the ‘Middle Ages’, the die had already been cast for roughly the next thousand years of biblical interpretation. This is not, as some have suggested, because the medieval world was devoid of intellectual creativity — the Eastern Empire … Continue reading ‘The Faith Once Delivered to the Saints’: Tradition and Scripture from the Medieval World to Today

The Shepherd’s Sheep: A Reflection on John 10.22-30

Insider and outsider, right and wrong, orthodox and heterodox, us and them — If there’s one thing humanity seems to excel at it’s turning differences into divisions, and building community around shared identity at the expense and exclusion of others. This is why, despite the near-universal and millennia-old religious calls for love and compassion and … Continue reading The Shepherd’s Sheep: A Reflection on John 10.22-30

Allegory and its Limits: Reading the Bible in Alexandria & Antioch

By the third century, Christianity was no longer a fledgling faith, but had come into its own as a spiritual and intellectual force in the Roman world. Across the Empire, despite periodic and localized persecutions, Christians could be found in most walks life, found among slaves and citizens, and from the army to the Imperial … Continue reading Allegory and its Limits: Reading the Bible in Alexandria & Antioch